1. What if Aaron Sorkin’s "The Newsroom" took place in fast-food restaurant?

    Amy Schumer has an idea.

    In “The Foodroom” a restaurant manager must defend his old-school ways against the increasing pressure to offer healthy options. Like classic Sorkin “The Foodroom” will show how “a woman’s life is worth nothing unless she’s making a great man greater.” Featuring Josh Charles and Amy Schumer. (Video dur. 4:12)

     
  2. 1,000 likes!

    1,000 likes!

    (Source: assets)

     

     1000 likes  tumblr milestone 

  3. Louis Lumière filmed these images 119 years ago today. This forty-six second long film "Workers Leaving the Lumiere Factory" or _”La Sortie des usines Lumière à Lyon” _ was one of ten historic films presented in first public screening of films at which admission was charged on December 28, 1895.

    There are several versions of the film.

    Three are presented above.

    Lumière shot a test that was printed on paper the previous summer. The first on flexible film was shot on March 19, 1895. That is the second version shown here. The most widely screened version was shot in the summer of 1895. That appears last.

    The structure that the workers are filing out of has survived and has been preserved. The "Hangar du Premier-Film" was the last relic of the photographic product factory built by Antoine Lumière in Monplaisir.

    (Source: youtube.com)

     

     lumière  lumiere  film history  louis lumiere 

  4. fastcodesign:

The Story Behind The THX Deep Note
Something between a black MIDI glissando and a brown note, the THX “Deep Note” is one of the world’s most recognizable audio logos, signaling the highest quality audio standard in films. Parodied by The Simpsons and sampled by Dr. Dre (which got him sued), at peak popularity the THX Deep Note was played in front of 4,000 movie theater audiences a day, or around once every 20 seconds. Yet despite its distinctive crescendo, the THX Deep Note wasn’t actually composed so much as it was programmed, which makes it a fascinating success story of early computer audio design.
More> Co.Design

    fastcodesign:

    The Story Behind The THX Deep Note

    Something between a black MIDI glissando and a brown note, the THX “Deep Note” is one of the world’s most recognizable audio logos, signaling the highest quality audio standard in films. Parodied by The Simpsons and sampled by Dr. Dre (which got him sued), at peak popularity the THX Deep Note was played in front of 4,000 movie theater audiences a day, or around once every 20 seconds. Yet despite its distinctive crescendo, the THX Deep Note wasn’t actually composed so much as it was programmed, which makes it a fascinating success story of early computer audio design.

    More> Co.Design

     
  5. Inside The Netflix/Comcast Deal and What The Media Is Getting Very Wrong


  "Netflix decided it made sense to pay Comcast for every port they use to connect to Comcast’s network, like many other content owners and network providers have done. This is how the Internet works, and it’s not about providing better access for one content owner over another, it simply comes down to Netflix making a business decision that it makes sense for them to deliver their content directly to Comcast, instead of through a third party."

    Inside The Netflix/Comcast Deal and What The Media Is Getting Very Wrong

    "Netflix decided it made sense to pay Comcast for every port they use to connect to Comcast’s network, like many other content owners and network providers have done. This is how the Internet works, and it’s not about providing better access for one content owner over another, it simply comes down to Netflix making a business decision that it makes sense for them to deliver their content directly to Comcast, instead of through a third party."

     

     netflix  comcast  streaming video  net neutrality  broadband 

  6. tiffanyb:

    If you’re a Dropbox user, you probably got an email in the last few days about an update to their TOS that basically puts all disputes into arbitration rather than litigation. 

    If you’re like me, you probably glossed over this update because gah, legalese. 

    Allow me to summarize what it means when a company wants to handle all disputes in arbitration:

    No matter what they do (delete your data, privacy breach, overcharging, whatever), you don’t get to sue. Instead, THEY get to choose the arbitrator according to whatever criteria they want, and thus any dispute is decided by someone they’re paying.

    Also, you can’t join a class-action suit against them. Which sounds like no big deal, but when a company takes advantage of a bunch of people all in the same small way (incorrectly assessing a service charge, for example), class action is how companies are made to clean up their act en masse, instead of waiting for thousands of people to call them up and demand their $20 back or whatever.

    I love Dropbox and use/recommend it enthusiastically. But this is a company that we entrust with some of our most important data- the kind of data we need to have access to wherever we are. Family photos, portfolios, projects representing years of work, etc. And as we’ve seen with Google buying Nest, even if we trust the management team in charge of our data right now, that’s not guaranteed in the future. Founders move on to other things. Companies with great products get acquired. Business decisions get made that change the direction of the company.

    The agreement we make with Dropbox is too important to be enforced only by an arbitrator of their choosing. You have 30 days from the date of notification to opt out of the arbitration clause. Do it now.

     
  7. propagandery:


The Most Detailed Saturn V Cutaway We’ve Ever Seen
     
  8. newsweek:

About 40 miles north of the Irvine headquarters of In‑N‑Out Burger, the noonday sun makes the gritty industrial landscape of Baldwin Park simmer like a Double-Double fresh off the grill. 

Hulking tractor-trailers emblazoned with the fast-food chain’s familiar logo navigate the narrow asphalt arteries of a sprawling warehouse complex that serves as In‑N‑Out’s distribution center, a short distance from the spot where Harry and Esther Snyder opened their long-since-shuttered first stand back in 1948. 

A tour bus contingent of Asian visitors, apparently fresh from lunch at an In‑N‑Out on the edge of the complex, is now milling about in front of the In‑N‑Out University training center, snapping photos and perusing the classic car-themed memorabilia in the company gift store. 

The visitors’ fascination with a regional hamburger chain is no surprise, considering that over the years, In‑N‑Out—whose freshly-made, premium burgers are famously craved by Hollywood luminaries and rock stars—has become an enduring part of California’s mystique. 

The sightseers don’t seem to notice an SUV pulling up. It contains a trim, athletic blonde in a chic black-on-black ensemble accessorized by a stylishly chunky rose-gold Michael Kors wristwatch and a necklace with a glittering Star of David pendant. 

She is just 31, but Bloomberg News recently valued the company she controls at $1.1 billion, making her the youngest woman with a 10-digit net worth in America. Forbes estimates her wealth at $500 million. (via Meet Lynsi Snyder, president of In-N-Out)

    newsweek:

    About 40 miles north of the Irvine headquarters of In‑N‑Out Burger, the noonday sun makes the gritty industrial landscape of Baldwin Park simmer like a Double-Double fresh off the grill.

    Hulking tractor-trailers emblazoned with the fast-food chain’s familiar logo navigate the narrow asphalt arteries of a sprawling warehouse complex that serves as In‑N‑Out’s distribution center, a short distance from the spot where Harry and Esther Snyder opened their long-since-shuttered first stand back in 1948.

    A tour bus contingent of Asian visitors, apparently fresh from lunch at an In‑N‑Out on the edge of the complex, is now milling about in front of the In‑N‑Out University training center, snapping photos and perusing the classic car-themed memorabilia in the company gift store.

    The visitors’ fascination with a regional hamburger chain is no surprise, considering that over the years, In‑N‑Out—whose freshly-made, premium burgers are famously craved by Hollywood luminaries and rock stars—has become an enduring part of California’s mystique.

    The sightseers don’t seem to notice an SUV pulling up. It contains a trim, athletic blonde in a chic black-on-black ensemble accessorized by a stylishly chunky rose-gold Michael Kors wristwatch and a necklace with a glittering Star of David pendant.

    She is just 31, but Bloomberg News recently valued the company she controls at $1.1 billion, making her the youngest woman with a 10-digit net worth in America. Forbes estimates her wealth at $500 million. (via Meet Lynsi Snyder, president of In-N-Out)

     
  9. Devo founding guitarist Bob Casale - Bob2- died Monday after medical complications unexpectedly led to heart failure, his brother Gerald said. Bob Casale was 61.

    From an appreciation by Randall Roberts, Los Angeles Times Pop Music Critic

    Whether it was Bob2, who died Tuesday at age 61, his brother Gerald Casale, Mark Mothersbaugh or his brother Bob Mothersbaugh (Bob1), who made which noise didn’t matter within the tight confines of “Gut Feeling,” “Uncontrollable Urge,” “Gates of Steel,” “Penetration in the Centerfold” or the dozens of others. Bob2 was part of the machine, one that sought to erase individualism for the greater good — and succeeded.

     

     Devo  bob casale  gerald casale  mark mothersbaugh  bob mothersbaugh 

  10. Via: "Found: Rolling Stones"

    “Recently found in an unmarked box at a Southern California estate sale, taken in and around the landscape of Savannah, Georgia and Clearwater, Florida, the photographer remains unknown”

     

     the rolling stones  mick jagger  keith richards  brian jones  bill wyman  charlie watts